Absence+of+warmth

  • 1 cold — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) I n. iciness; ailment, flu. adj. chilling (see cold); unheated; unresponsive, indifferent, unenthusiastic. See cold, disease, insensibility. II Condition of low temperature Nouns 1. cold, coldness,… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 2 cold — I. a. 1. Devoid of warmth or heat, chilled, frigid, gelid, cool, cooled. 2. Bleak, raw, biting, cutting, nipping, chill, chilly, boreal, arctic, polar, frosty, icy, wintry, hyemal, brumal. 3. Chilly, chill, shivering. 4. Apathetic, unsympathetic …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 3 severe — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) adj. austerity, serious, earnest; rigorous, trying; harsh, strict; sharp, distressing, extreme. See severity, importance, adversity. Ant., relaxed, laissez faire. II (Roget s IV) modif. 1. [Stern] Syn.… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 4 severe — [sə vir′] adj. severer, severest [< MFr < OFr < L severus, prob. < se , apart (see SECEDE) + IE base * wer , (to be) friendly > OE wær, faith, pledge, bond (of friendship)] 1. harsh, strict, or highly critical, as in treatment;… …

    English World dictionary

  • 5 inhumanity — noun (plural ties) Date: 15th century 1. a. the quality or state of being cruel or barbarous b. a cruel or barbarous act 2. absence of warmth or geniality ; impersonality …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 6 severe — adjective (severer; est) Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin severus Date: 1548 1. a. strict in judgment, discipline, or government b. of a strict or stern bearing or manner ; austere 2. rigorous in restraint, punishment …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 7 distance — distanceless, adj. /dis teuhns/, n., v., distanced, distancing. n. 1. the extent or amount of space between two things, points, lines, etc. 2. the state or fact of being apart in space, as of one thing from another; remoteness. 3. a linear extent …

    Universalium

  • 8 distance — dis•tance [[t]ˈdɪs təns[/t]] n. v. tanced, tanc•ing 1) the extent or amount of space between two things, points, lines, etc 2) the state or fact of being apart in space, as of one thing from another; remoteness 3) a linear extent of space: to… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 9 cool|ness — «KOOL nihs», noun. 1. the condition of being or feeling cool; cool quality or sensation. 2. Figurative. freedom from excitement; calmness: »Only [his] coolness and tact averted a conflict (John Richard Green). 3. Figurative. lack of fervor or… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 10 literature — /lit euhr euh cheuhr, choor , li treuh /, n. 1. writings in which expression and form, in connection with ideas of permanent and universal interest, are characteristic or essential features, as poetry, novels, history, biography, and essays. 2.… …

    Universalium

  • 11 climate — /kluy mit/, n. 1. the composite or generally prevailing weather conditions of a region, as temperature, air pressure, humidity, precipitation, sunshine, cloudiness, and winds, throughout the year, averaged over a series of years. 2. a region or… …

    Universalium

  • 12 interior design — 1. the design and coordination of the decorative elements of the interior of a house, apartment, office, or other structural space, including color schemes, fittings, furnishings, and sometimes architectural features. 2. the art, business, or… …

    Universalium

  • 13 performing arts — arts or skills that require public performance, as acting, singing, or dancing. [1945 50] * * * ▪ 2009 Introduction Music Classical.       The last vestiges of the Cold War seemed to thaw for a moment on Feb. 26, 2008, when the unfamiliar strains …

    Universalium

  • 14 Life Sciences — ▪ 2009 Introduction Zoology       In 2008 several zoological studies provided new insights into how species life history traits (such as the timing of reproduction or the length of life of adult individuals) are derived in part as responses to… …

    Universalium

  • 15 sensory reception, human — Introduction  means by which humans react to changes in external and internal environments.   Ancient philosophers called the human senses “the windows of the soul,” and Aristotle described at least five senses sight, hearing, smell, taste, and… …

    Universalium

  • 16 nervous system, human — ▪ anatomy Introduction       system that conducts stimuli from sensory receptors to the brain and spinal cord and that conducts impulses back to other parts of the body. As with other higher vertebrates, the human nervous system has two main… …

    Universalium

  • 17 Europe, history of — Introduction       history of European peoples and cultures from prehistoric times to the present. Europe is a more ambiguous term than most geographic expressions. Its etymology is doubtful, as is the physical extent of the area it designates.… …

    Universalium

  • 18 cold — [kōld] adj. [ME < OE (Anglian) cald < IE base * gel , cold > COOL, Ger kalt, L gelidus] 1. of a temperature significantly or noticeably lower than average, normal, expected, or comfortable; very chilly; frigid [a cold wind] 2. a) without …

    English World dictionary

  • 19 Eastern Orthodox Christian theology — is the theology particular to the Eastern Orthodox Church. It is characterized by monotheistic Trinitarianism, belief in the Incarnation of the Logos (Son of God), a balancing of cataphatic theology with apophatic theology, a hermeneutic defined… …

    Wikipedia

  • 20 Earth Sciences — ▪ 2009 Introduction Geology and Geochemistry       The theme of the 33rd International Geological Congress, which was held in Norway in August 2008, was “Earth System Science: Foundation for Sustainable Development.” It was attended by nearly… …

    Universalium


We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.