Contrive

  • 1 contrive — contrive, devise, invent, frame, concoct mean to find a way of making or doing something or of achieving an end by the exercise of one s mind. Contrive implies ingenuity or cleverness in planning, designing, or in scheming; it is a matter of… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 2 Contrive — are a heavy metal band[1] from Melbourne, Australia formed in 1999. Their musical style has been compared to that of Sepultura.[2] The band consists of bassist Tim Stahlmann and twin brothers Paul Haug (vocals, guitars) and Andrew Haug… …

    Wikipedia

  • 3 Contrive — Con*trive (k[o^]n*tr[imac]v ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Contrived}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Contriving}.] [OE. contriven, contreven, controven, to invent, OF. controver, contruver; con + trouver to find. See {Troubadour}, {trover}.] To form by an exercise… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 contrive — [kən trīv′] vt. contrived, contriving [ME contreven < OFr controver, to find out, contrive, imagine < VL contropare, to compare < com, COM + tropus, TROPE] 1. to think up; devise; scheme; plan [to contrive a way to help] 2. to construct… …

    English World dictionary

  • 5 Contrive — Con*trive , v. i. To make devices; to form designs; to plan; to scheme; to plot. [1913 Webster] The Fates with traitors do contrive. Shak. [1913 Webster] Thou hast contrived against th very life Of the defendant. Shak. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6 contrive — I verb arrange, cause, collude, compose, conceive, concoct, connive, consider, conspire, counterplot, design, develop a course, devise, draft, effect, excogitare, fabricate, fashion, forecast, form, frame, imagine, improvise, induce, intrigue,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 7 contrive — early 14c., from O.Fr. controver (Mod.Fr. controuver) to find out, contrive, imagine, from L.L. contropare to compare (via a figure of speech), from L. com with (see COM (Cf. com )) + tropus song, musical mode, from Gk. tropos figure of speech… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 8 contrive — [v1] invent, design come up with, concoct, construct, cook up, create, devise, dream up*, engineer, fabricate, fashion, forge, form, formulate, frame*, handle, hatch, improvise, make, make up*, manipulate, manufacture, move, plan, plot, project,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 9 contrive — ► VERB 1) devise or plan using skill and artifice. 2) manage to do something foolish. DERIVATIVES contrivable adjective contriver noun. ORIGIN Old French controver imagine, invent , from Latin contropare compare …

    English terms dictionary

  • 10 contrive — [[t]kəntra͟ɪv[/t]] contrives, contriving, contrived 1) VERB If you contrive an event or situation, you succeed in making it happen, often by tricking someone. [FORMAL] [V n] The oil companies were accused of contriving a shortage of gasoline to… …

    English dictionary

  • 11 contrive — UK [kənˈtraɪv] / US verb Word forms contrive : present tense I/you/we/they contrive he/she/it contrives present participle contriving past tense contrived past participle contrived formal 1) a) [transitive] to make something happen, especially by …

    English dictionary

  • 12 contrive — con|trive [ kən traıv ] verb FORMAL 1. ) transitive to make something happen, especially by using clever or dishonest methods: They would have to contrive a meeting. a ) intransitive to succeed in doing something, especially something difficult:… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 13 contrive — [14] In Middle English, contrive was controve; it was not transformed into contrive (perhaps under the influence of Scottish pronunciation) until the 15th century. It came via Old French controver from Latin contropāre ‘represent metaphorically,… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 14 contrive — verb (T) 1 to arrange an event or situation in a clever way, especially secretly or by deceiving people: He managed to contrive a meeting between Janet and her ex boyfriend. 2 formal to succeed in doing something in spite of difficulties:… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 15 contrive — [14] In Middle English, contrive was controve; it was not transformed into contrive (perhaps under the influence of Scottish pronunciation) until the 15th century. It came via Old French controver from Latin contropāre ‘represent metaphorically,… …

    Word origins

  • 16 contrive — verb (contrived; contriving) Etymology: Middle English controven, contreven, from Anglo French controver, contrever, from Medieval Latin contropare to compare, from Latin com + Vulgar Latin *tropare to compose, find more at troubador Date: 14th… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 17 contrive — verb a) To form by an exercise of ingenuity; to devise; to plan; to scheme; to plot. ...I cannot bear the idea of two y …

    Wiktionary

  • 18 contrive — con|trive [kənˈtraıv] v [T] [Date: 1200 1300; : Old French; Origin: controver, from Late Latin contropare] 1.) formal to succeed in doing something in spite of difficulties contrive to do sth ▪ Schindler contrived to save more than 1,000 Polish… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 19 contrive — con•trive [[t]kənˈtraɪv[/t]] v. trived, triv•ing 1) to plan with ingenuity; devise; invent: to contrive a means of escape[/ex] 2) to bring about by a plan, scheme, etc.; manage: He contrived to gain their votes[/ex] 3) to plot (evil, treachery,… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 20 contrive — contrivable, adj. contriver, n. /keuhn truyv /, v., contrived, contriving. v.t. 1. to plan with ingenuity; devise; invent: The author contrived a clever plot. 2. to bring about or effect by a plan, scheme, or the like; manage: He contrived to… …

    Universalium