Extent

  • 1 Extent — Ex*tent , n. [L. extentus, fr. extendere. See {Extend}.] 1. Space or degree to which a thing is extended; hence, superficies; compass; bulk; size; length; as, an extent of country or of line; extent of information or of charity. [1913 Webster]… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 Extent — has several meanings: *Extent (file systems), a contiguous piece of a file on a computer storage medium *Wingspan, the extent between the tips of the wings of a bird, bat, or other flying animal *Reach (physical measurement), the extent between… …

    Wikipedia

  • 3 extent — I noun amount, area, borders, bounds, breadth, circuit, compass, comprehensiveness, coverage, degree, dimensions, distance, expanse, gauge, hactenus, length, limit, limitation, magnitude, measure, quantity, range, reach, scope, size, space,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 4 extent — ► NOUN 1) the area covered by something. 2) size or scale. 3) the degree to which something is the case: everyone compromises to some extent. ORIGIN Old French extente, from Latin extendere stretch out …

    English terms dictionary

  • 5 extent — [ek stent′, ikstent′] n. [ME extente < Anglo Fr < OFr estente < estendre < L extendere] 1. the space, amount, or degree to which a thing extends; size; length; breadth 2. range or limits of anything; scope; coverage 3. an extended… …

    English World dictionary

  • 6 Extent — Ex*tent , a. [L. extentus, p. p. of extendere. See {Extend}.] Extended. [Obs.] Spenser. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 Extent — Extent, in England der mit Hülfsvollstreckung in die Güter verbundene persönliche Arrest …

    Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • 8 extent — early 14c., from Anglo Fr. extente, O.Fr. estente valuation of land, stretch of land, from fem. pp. of O.Fr. extendre extend, from L. extendere (see EXTEND (Cf. extend)). Meaning degree to which something extends is from 1590s …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 9 extent — *size, dimensions, area, magnitude, volume Analogous words: *range, scope, compass, sweep, reach, radius: stretch, spread, amplitude, *expanse …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 10 extent — [n] range, magnitude admeasurement, ambit, amount, amplitude, area, bounds, breadth, bulk, capaciousness, compass, degree, dimensions, duration, elbowroom*, expanse, expansion, extension, intensity, leeway, length, limit, mass, matter, measure,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 11 extent — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ full, greatest, maximum, overall ▪ The overall extent of civilian casualties remained unclear. ▪ actual, exact, precise …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 12 extent — [[t]ɪkste̱nt[/t]] ♦♦♦ 1) N SING: with supp, usu the N of n If you are talking about how great, important, or serious a difficulty or situation is, you can refer to the extent of it. The government itself has little information on the extent of… …

    English dictionary

  • 13 extent — ex|tent W1S2 [ıkˈstent] n [Date: 1500 1600; : Anglo French; Origin: extente, from Latin extendere; EXTEND] 1.) to ... extent used to say how true something is or how great an effect or change is to a certain extent/to some extent/to an extent… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 14 extent — ex|tent [ ık stent ] noun *** 1. ) uncount the importance of a problem or situation: extent of: We were shocked by the extent of the damage. The government underestimated the extent of the contamination. the full/true extent: Doctors still do not …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 15 extent — /Ik stent/ noun 1 (singular) the limit or degree of something s influence etc: The success of a marriage depends on the extent to which you are prepared to work at it. | to a certain extent/to some extent (=used to say that something is partly,… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 16 extent */*/*/ — UK [ɪkˈstent] / US noun 1) [uncountable] the size and importance of a problem or situation extent of: We were shocked by the extent of the damage. The government underestimated the extent of the contamination. the full/true extent: Doctors still… …

    English dictionary

  • 17 extent*/*/*/ — [ɪkˈstent] noun 1) [singular/U] the degree to which something happens, or the degree to which something is affected They were shocked at the extent of the damage.[/ex] Languages vary in the extent to which they rely on word order.[/ex] 2) [U] the …

    Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • 18 extent — n. to a certain extent (to a great extent; they were emaciated to such an extent that they required special treatment) * * * [ɪk stent] to a certain extent (to a great extent; they were emaciated to such an extent that they required special… …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 19 Extent — Sur les autres projets Wikimedia : « Extent », sur le Wiktionnaire (dictionnaire universel) Un extent (ou domaine[1]) est une zone de stockage contiguë réservée pour un fichier sur le système de fichiers d un ordinateur. Lorsqu on… …

    Wikipédia en Français

  • 20 extent — noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French estente, extente land valuation, from extendre, estendre to survey, evaluate, literally, to extend Date: 14th century 1. archaic valuation (as of land) in Great Britain especially for taxation 2.… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary


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