Recover+from

  • 1 recover from — phr verb Recover from is used with these nouns as the object: ↑accident, ↑anaesthetic, ↑effect, ↑illness, ↑infection, ↑injury, ↑ordeal, ↑shock, ↑strain, ↑trauma, ↑wreckage …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 2 recover from a trauma — recover from shock, get over a shock …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 3 recover from a defeat — recuperate from a loss …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 4 recover from the battlefield — send back from the battlefield …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 5 recover — re‧cov‧er [rɪˈkʌvə ǁ ər] verb 1. [intransitive] to increase or improve after falling in value or getting worse: • Its shares plunged at the start of trading, but recovered to close only slightly down. 2. [transitive] FINANCE to get back money… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 6 Recover — Re*cov er (r?*k?v ?r), v. i. 1. To regain health after sickness; to grow well; to be restored or cured; hence, to regain a former state or condition after misfortune, alarm, etc.; often followed by of or from; as, to recover from a state of… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 recover — 01. It took my grandmother a long time to [recover] from the death of my grandfather. 02. Doctors believe my mother s quick [recovery] from her illness was partly due to her desire to see her grandchildren again. 03. Police have announced that… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 8 recover — [[t]rɪkʌ̱və(r)[/t]] ♦♦♦ recovers, recovering, recovered 1) VERB When you recover from an illness or an injury, you become well again. [V from n/ ing] He is recovering from a knee injury... A policeman was recovering in hospital last night after… …

    English dictionary

  • 9 recover — re|cov|er W2 [rıˈkʌvə US ər] v [Date: 1200 1300; : Old French; Origin: recovrer, from Latin recuperare; RECUPERATE] 1.) to get better after an illness, accident, shock etc ▪ After a few days of fever, she began to recover. recover from ▪ He s in… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 10 recover — recoverer, n. /ri kuv euhr/, v.t. 1. to get back or regain (something lost or taken away): to recover a stolen watch. 2. to make up for or make good (loss, damage, etc., to oneself). 3. to regain the strength, composure, balance, or the like, of… …

    Universalium

  • 11 recover — 1 verb 1 GET BETTER (I) 2 a) to get better after an illness, accident, shock etc: After a few days of fever, he began to recover. (+ from): My boss is recovering from a heart attack. b) if something recovers after a period of trouble or… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 12 recover — I UK [rɪˈkʌvə(r)] / US [rɪˈkʌvər] verb Word forms recover : present tense I/you/we/they recover he/she/it recovers present participle recovering past tense recovered past participle recovered *** 1) [intransitive] to become fit and healthy again… …

    English dictionary

  • 13 recover — /rəˈkʌvə / (say ruh kuvuh) verb (t) 1. to get again, or regain (something lost or taken away): to recover lost property. 2. to make up for or make good (loss, damage, etc., to oneself). 3. to regain the strength, composure, balance, etc., of… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 14 recover — re|cov|er1 [ rı kʌvər ] verb *** 1. ) intransitive to become fit and healthy again after an illness or an injury: recover from: I haven t fully recovered from that flu I had. a ) to stop being affected by an unpleasant experience: He was fired… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 15 recover — v. (D; intr., tr.) to recover from (to recover from an illness; the police recovered the missing items from the bottom of the river) * * * [rɪ kʌvə] (D; intr., tr.) to recover from (to recover from an illness; the police recovered the missing… …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 16 recover — verb ADVERB ▪ completely, fully ▪ partially ▪ mostly (esp. AmE) ▪ only just ▪ hardly …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 17 recover — re•cov•er [[t]rɪˈkʌv ər[/t]] v. t. 1) to get back or regain (something lost or taken away) 2) to make up for or make good (loss, damage, etc.) to oneself 3) to regain the strength, composure, balance, or the like, of (oneself) 4) law a) to obtain …

    From formal English to slang

  • 18 Recover —   An automated system can often automatically recover from corrupted data in the data base (most of the time). See also Consistency …

    International financial encyclopaedia

  • 19 Recover — Re*cov er (r?*k?v ?r), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Recovered} ( ?rd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Recovering}. ] [OE. recoveren, OF. recovrer, F. recouvrer, from L. recuperare; pref. re re + a word of unknown origin. Cf.{Recuperate}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To get or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 20 Recover arms — Recover Re*cov er (r?*k?v ?r), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Recovered} ( ?rd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Recovering}. ] [OE. recoveren, OF. recovrer, F. recouvrer, from L. recuperare; pref. re re + a word of unknown origin. Cf.{Recuperate}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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