Unmoved

  • 1 unmoved — UK US /ʌnˈmuːvd/ adjective [after noun] STOCK MARKET ► not having changed in value: unmoved on sth »The drugs giant was unmoved on 2396p. unmoved at sth »The share price was unmoved at 182p …

    Financial and business terms

  • 2 unmoved — [unmo͞ovd′] adj. 1. not moved from its place 2. firm or unchanged in purpose 3. not having one s feelings stirred [unmoved by another s suffering] …

    English World dictionary

  • 3 Unmoved — Un*moved , a. Not moved; fixed; firm; unshaken; calm; apathetic. {Un*mov ed*ly}, adv. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 unmoved — index callous, cold blooded, impervious, inexpressive, insensible, insusceptible (uncaring), irreconcilable …

    Law dictionary

  • 5 unmoved — late 14c., not affected by emotion or excitement, from UN (Cf. un ) (1) not + pp. of MOVE (Cf. move) (v.) …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 6 unmoved — ► ADJECTIVE 1) not affected by emotion or excitement. 2) not changed in purpose or position. DERIVATIVES unmovable (also unmoveable) adjective …

    English terms dictionary

  • 7 unmoved — [[t]ʌ̱nmu͟ːvd[/t]] ADJ GRADED: v link ADJ If you are unmoved by something, you are not emotionally affected by it. Mr Bird remained unmoved by the corruption allegations... His face was unmoved, but on his lips there was a trace of displeasure.… …

    English dictionary

  • 8 unmoved — adj. VERBS ▪ appear, be, seem ▪ remain ▪ leave sb ▪ Her daughter s accident had left her curiously unmoved. ADVERB …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 9 unmoved — un|moved [ʌnˈmu:vd] adj [not before noun] feeling no pity, sympathy, or sadness unmoved by ▪ Richard seemed unmoved by the tragedy …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 10 unmoved — adjective 1) he was totally unmoved by her outburst Syn: unaffected, untouched, unimpressed, aloof, cool, cold, dry eyed; unconcerned, uncaring, unsympathetic, unreceptive, indifferent, impassive, unemotional, stoical, phlegmatic …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 11 unmoved — un|moved [ ʌn muvd ] adjective not feeling any emotion, especially feeling no sympathy or sadness when other people would expect you to: She was completely unmoved by his appeal for help …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 12 unmoved — adjective (not before noun) feeling no pity, sympathy, or sadness, especially in a situation where most people would feel this: Richard remained unmoved throughout the funeral …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 13 unmoved — UK [ʌnˈmuːvd] / US [ʌnˈmuvd] adjective formal not feeling any emotion, especially feeling no sympathy or sadness when other people would expect you to She was completely unmoved by his appeal for help …

    English dictionary

  • 14 unmoved — adj. * * * …

    Universalium

  • 15 unmoved — adjective a) not physically moved b) not affected emotionally, or not showing emotion …

    Wiktionary

  • 16 unmoved — Synonyms and related words: adamant, adamantine, aloof, apathetic, at a standstill, at anchor, at rest, aweless, calm, cast iron, cloistered, collected, composed, cool, dead still, dispassionate, dour, dwindling, ebbing, even tenored, expected,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 17 unmoved — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) adj. unaffected, impassive, unsympathetic, etc.; unconvinced, firm, unwavering, unshaken, steadfast. See insensibility. II (Roget s IV) modif. 1. [Not moved physically] Syn. firm, stable, motionless,… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 18 unmoved — adj. impassive, unaffected, untouched, unfeeling …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 19 unmoved — adjective 1》 not affected by emotion or excitement. 2》 not changed in purpose or position. Derivatives unmovable (also unmoveable) adjective …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 20 unmoved — a. 1. Firm, steadfast, unwavering, unswerving, unfaltering, constant. 2. Calm, collected, self possessed, cool, undisturbed, quiet. 3. Indifferent, insensible, unaffected, untouched, unstirred, with dry eyes, without a tear …

    New dictionary of synonyms


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