attract

  • 1 attract — at‧tract [əˈtrækt] verb [transitive] 1. to make someone want to buy something, do something, or take part in something: • Advertisements for a new headmaster attracted 120 candidates. attract somebody to something • What attracted me most to the… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 2 attract — vb Attract, allure, charm, fascinate, bewitch, enchant, captivate mean to draw another by exerting an irresistible or compelling influence over him. The same distinctions in implications and connotations are observable in the adjectival forms of… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 3 Attract — At*tract , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Attracted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Attracting}.] [L. attractus, p. p. of attrahere; ad + trahere to draw. See {Trace}, v. t.] 1. To draw to, or cause to tend to; esp. to cause to approach, adhere, or combine; or to cause …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 attract — [ə trakt′] vt. [ME attracten < L attractus, pp. of attrahere, to draw to < ad , to + trahere, DRAW] 1. to draw to itself or oneself; make approach or adhere [magnets attract iron] 2. to get the admiration, attention, etc. of; allure [his… …

    English World dictionary

  • 5 attract — early 15c., from L. attractus, pp. of attrahere to draw, pull; to attract, from ad to (see AD (Cf. ad )) + trahere draw (see TRACT (Cf. tract) (1)). Originally a medical term for the body s tendency to absorb fluids, nourishment, etc., or for a… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 6 Attract — At*tract , n. Attraction. [Obs.] Hudibras. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 attract — index bait (lure), coax, interest, inveigle, lure, motivate Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 8 attract — [v] draw attention allure, appeal to, bait, beckon, beguile, bewitch, bring, captivate, charm, come on*, court, drag, draw, enchant, endear, engage, enthrall, entice, entrance, exert influence, fascinate, freak out*, give the comeon*, go over big …

    New thesaurus

  • 9 attract — ► VERB 1) draw in by offering something interesting or advantageous. 2) cause (a specified reaction). 3) (often be attracted to) cause to have a liking for or interest in. 4) draw (something) closer by exerting a force. DERIVATIVES attractor noun …

    English terms dictionary

  • 10 attract */*/*/ — UK [əˈtrækt] / US verb [transitive] Word forms attract : present tense I/you/we/they attract he/she/it attracts present participle attracting past tense attracted past participle attracted 1) a) to make someone interested in something so that… …

    English dictionary

  • 11 attract — 01. The meat they ve been putting in the garbage is starting to [attract] rats. 02. His wife is very [attractive], and always gets lots of attention from the men at parties. 03. We put a rotten fish head in the trap to [attract] the shrimp. 04.… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 12 attract — at|tract [ ə trækt ] verb transitive *** 1. ) to make someone interested in something so that they do it or come to see or hear it: The show attracts viewers from every sector of society. They hope to attract more foreign investors. Tourists are… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 13 attract — verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin attractus, past participle of attrahere, from ad + trahere to pull, draw Date: 15th century transitive verb to cause to approach or adhere: as a. to pull to or draw toward oneself or itself < a magnet… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 14 attract — at|tract W2S2 [əˈtrækt] v [T] [Date: 1400 1500; : Latin; Origin: , past participle of attrahere, from ad to + trahere to pull ] 1.) to make someone interested in something, or make them want to take part in something attract sb to sth ▪ What… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 15 attract — [[t]ətræ̱kt[/t]] ♦♦ attracts, attracting, attracted 1) VERB If something attracts people or animals, it has features that cause them to come to it. [V n] The Cardiff Bay project is attracting many visitors... [V n adv/prep] Warm weather has… …

    English dictionary

  • 16 attract — verb (T) 1 to make someone interested in something, or make them want to take part in something: attract sb to sth: What attracted me most to the job was the chance to travel. | attract interest/attention etc: The story has attracted a lot of… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 17 attract — attractable, adj. attractableness, n. attractingly, adv. attractor, attracter, n. /euh trakt /, v.t. 1. to draw by a physical force causing or tending to cause to approach, adhere, or unite; pull (opposed to repel): The gravitational force of the …

    Universalium

  • 18 attract — verb Attract is used with these nouns as the subject: ↑college, ↑festival, ↑magnet Attract is used with these nouns as the object: ↑applicant, ↑attention, ↑audience, ↑bee, ↑business, ↑butterfly, ↑buyer, ↑ …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 19 attract — v. (D; tr.) to attract to (a crowd was attracted to the scene of the accident) * * * [ə trækt] (D; tr.) to attract to (a crowd was attracted to the scene of the accident) …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 20 attract — [15] Etymologically, attract means literally ‘pull something towards one’. It comes from attract , the past participial stem of the Latin verb attrahere, a compound formed from the prefix ad ‘to’ and the verb trahere ‘pull’. It was quite a late… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins