deteriorate

  • 1 deteriorate — de‧te‧ri‧o‧rate [dɪˈtɪəriəreɪt ǁ ˈtɪr ] verb [intransitive] to become worse: • The economy deteriorated further in August, with orders for manufactured goods falling. deterioration noun [countable, uncountable] : • a deterioration in sales * * *… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 2 Deteriorate — De*te ri*o*rate (d[ e]*t[=e] r[i^]*[ o]*r[=a]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Deteriorated} (d[ e]*t[=e] r[i^]*[ o]*r[=a] t[e^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Deteriorating} (d[ e]*t[=e] r[i^]*[ o]*r[=a] t[i^]ng).] [L. deterioratus, p. p. of deteriorare to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 deteriorate — de*te ri*o*rate (d[ e]*t[=e] r[i^]*[ o]*r[=a]t), v. i. To grow worse; to be impaired in quality; to degenerate. [1913 Webster] Under such conditions, the mind rapidly deteriorates. Goldsmith. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 deteriorate — I verb adulterate, aggravate, atrophy, become worse, collapse, corrode, corrumpere, corrupt, debase, debauch, debilitate, decay, decline, decompose, decrease, defile, degenerate, degrade, demoralize, denature, depravare, depreciate, devalue,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 5 deteriorate — 1640s (as a pp. adj., 1570s), from L.L. deterioratus, pp. of deteriorare get worse, make worse, from L. deterior worse, lower, inferior, meaner, contrastive of *deter bad, lower, from PIE *de tero , from demonstrative stem *de (see DE (Cf. de)).… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 6 deteriorate — should be pronounced with all five syllables articulated. Pronunciation as if it were deteriate is often heard but should be avoided. A similar problem occurs with temporary and other words …

    Modern English usage

  • 7 deteriorate — [v] decay, degenerate adulterate, alloy, become worse, be worse for wear*, break, corrode, corrupt, crumble, debase, debilitate, decline, decompose, degrade, deprave, depreciate, descend, disimprove, disintegrate, ebb, fade, fail, fall apart,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 8 deteriorate — ► VERB ▪ become progressively worse. DERIVATIVES deterioration noun. ORIGIN Latin deteriorare, from deterior worse …

    English terms dictionary

  • 9 deteriorate — [dē tir′ē ə rāt΄, ditir′ē ə rāt΄] vt., vi. deteriorated, deteriorating [< LL deterioratus, pp. of deteriorare, to make worse < L deterior, worse, inferior < * deter, below < de , from + ter, compar. suffix] to make or become worse;… …

    English World dictionary

  • 10 deteriorate — 01. Grandpa s health has [deteriorated] a lot in the last few hours, and he isn t expected to live through the night. 02. Attempts at peace talks are continuing amid fears that the situation will [deteriorate] into a full scale war. 03. Weather… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 11 deteriorate */ — UK [dɪˈtɪərɪəreɪt] / US [dɪˈtɪrɪəˌreɪt] verb [intransitive] Word forms deteriorate : present tense I/you/we/they deteriorate he/she/it deteriorates present participle deteriorating past tense deteriorated past participle deteriorated to become… …

    English dictionary

  • 12 deteriorate — verb ADVERB ▪ badly, seriously, severely ▪ dramatically, quickly, rapidly, sharply ▪ slowly ▪ …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 13 deteriorate — de|te|ri|o|rate [ dı tıriə,reıt ] verb intransitive * to become worse: The weather deteriorated rapidly so the game was abandoned. deteriorate into: The economic situation could quickly deteriorate into social unrest. ╾ de|te|ri|o|ra|tion [… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 14 deteriorate — [16] The meaning of deteriorate resides etymologically in its first syllable, which represents the Latin preposition dē ‘down’. To this was added the adjectival suffix ter, to produce *dēter ‘bad’, and this in turn was modified with the… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 15 deteriorate — [16] The meaning of deteriorate resides etymologically in its first syllable, which represents the Latin preposition dē ‘down’. To this was added the adjectival suffix ter, to produce *dēter ‘bad’, and this in turn was modified with the… …

    Word origins

  • 16 deteriorate — verb ( rated; rating) Etymology: Late Latin deterioratus, past participle of deteriorare, from Latin deterior worse, from de + ter (suffix as in Latin uter which of two) + ior (comparative suffix) more at whether, er Date: 1572 transitive verb …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 17 deteriorate — See degenerate. See degenerate, deteriorate …

    Dictionary of problem words and expressions

  • 18 deteriorate — de|te|ri|o|rate [dıˈtıəriəreıt US ˈtır ] v [Date: 1500 1600; : Late Latin; Origin: deteriorare, from [i]Latin deterior worse ] 1.) to become worse ▪ Ethel s health has deteriorated. ▪ America s deteriorating economy 2.) deteriorate into sth to… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 19 deteriorate — [[t]dɪtɪ͟əriəreɪt[/t]] deteriorates, deteriorating, deteriorated VERB If something deteriorates, it becomes worse in some way. There are fears that the situation might deteriorate into full scale war... The weather conditions are deteriorating …

    English dictionary

  • 20 deteriorate — verb 1) his health deteriorated Syn: worsen, decline, degenerate; fail, slump, slip, go downhill, wane, ebb; informal go to pot Ant: improve 2) these materials deteriorate if stored wrongly …

    Thesaurus of popular words