draw+in

  • 1 draw in — ► draw in (of successive days) become shorter because of the changing seasons. Main Entry: ↑draw …

    English terms dictionary

  • 2 draw in — index converge, engage (involve), entrap, implicate, incriminate, involve (implicate) Burton s Leg …

    Law dictionary

  • 3 draw in — phrasal verb Word forms draw in : present tense I/you/we/they draw in he/she/it draws in present participle drawing in past tense drew in past participle drawn in 1) [intransitive] when the nights or days draw in, it becomes dark earlier in the… …

    English dictionary

  • 4 draw in — verb 1. pull inward or towards a center (Freq. 1) The pilot drew in the landing gear The cat retracted his claws • Syn: ↑retract • Derivationally related forms: ↑retraction (for: ↑ …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 5 draw in — 1) PHRASAL VERB If you say that the nights, evenings, or days are drawing in, you mean that it is becoming dark at an earlier time in the evening, because autumn or winter is approaching. [BRIT] [V P] The days draw in and the mornings get darker …

    English dictionary

  • 6 draw in — phr verb Draw in is used with these nouns as the subject: ↑train Draw in is used with these nouns as the object: ↑breath, ↑moisture, ↑viewer …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 7 draw in — Synonyms and related words: abbreviate, absorb, allure, argue, aspirate, bait, bait the hook, blandish, breathe in, bring around, cajole, catch up in, circumscribe, coarct, coax, compact, compress, concentrate, concern, condense, confine,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 8 draw in — verb Date: 1558 transitive verb 1. to cause or entice to enter or participate 2. to sketch roughly intransitive verb 1. a. to draw to an end < the day drew in > b. to …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 9 draw in — (Roget s Thesaurus II) I verb 1. To pull back in: retract, withdraw. See SHOW. 2. To involve (someone) in an activity: engage. See PARTICIPATE. II verb See draw …

    English dictionary for students

  • 10 draw in — (of successive days) become shorter or (of nights) start earlier, because of the changing seasons. → draw …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 11 draw in — pull into a scheme or a plan; involve someone in something …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 12 draw in your horns — draw/pull/in your horns phrase to start spending less money than you usually do Thesaurus: to save money, or to be careful with moneyhyponym to buy somethingsynonym Main entry: horn * * * draw …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 13 draw in your horns — draw/pull in (your) horns to act in a more careful way than you did before, especially by spending less money. He ll have to draw in his horns, now that he s lost his job …

    New idioms dictionary

  • 14 draw in horns — draw/pull in (your) horns to act in a more careful way than you did before, especially by spending less money. He ll have to draw in his horns, now that he s lost his job …

    New idioms dictionary

  • 15 draw in one's horns — See: PULL IN ONE S HORNS …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 16 draw in one's horns — See: PULL IN ONE S HORNS …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 17 draw in one's horns — phrasal : to act more conservatively or cautiously than at some former time he d better draw in his horns if he wants to keep out of trouble * * * draw in one s horns ▪ To moderate one s ardour or pretensions ▪ To curtail or restrict one s… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 18 draw\ in\ one's\ horns — • pull in one s horns • draw in one s horns v. phr. informal 1. To reduce your boasts; calm down from a quarrel; back down on a promise. He said he could beat any man there single handed, but he pulled in his horns when Jack came forward. 2. To… …

    Словарь американских идиом

  • 19 draw in one's horns — spend less money Their company is not doing well so they will have to draw in their horns for awhile …

    Idioms and examples

  • 20 draw in one's horns — ► draw (or pull) in one s horns become less assertive or ambitious. Main Entry: ↑horn …

    English terms dictionary