fallacy

  • 1 fallacy — fallacy, sophism, sophistry, casuistry are comparable when meaning unsound and misleading reasoning or line of argument. The same distinctions in implications and connotations are distinguishable in the corresponding adjectives fallacious,… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 2 Fallacy — Fal la*cy (f[a^]l l[.a]*s[y^]), n.; pl. {Fallacies} (f[a^]l l[.a]*s[i^]z). [OE. fallace, fallas, deception, F. fallace, fr. L. fallacia, fr. fallax deceitful, deceptive, fr. fallere to deceive. See {Fail}.] 1. Deceptive or false appearance;… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 fallacy — [fal′ə sē] n. pl. fallacies [ME fallace < OFr < L fallacia, deception, artifice < fallax (gen. fallacis), deceitful < fallere, to deceive: see FAIL] 1. Obs. deception 2. aptness to mislead; deceptive or delusive quality [the fallacy… …

    English World dictionary

  • 4 fallacy — I noun captio, deception, deceptive belief, delusion, deviation from truth, distortion, erroneous reasoning, erroneousness, error, fallacious argument, false appearance, falseness, falsity, faultiness, faulty reasoning, flaw in reasoning,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 5 fallacy — late 15c., deception, false statement, from L. fallacia deception, noun of quality from fallax (gen. fallacis) deceptive, from fallere deceive (see FAIL (Cf. fail)). Specific sense in logic dates from 1550s. An earlier form was fallace (c.1300),… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 6 fallacy — [n] illusion, misconception aberration, ambiguity, artifice, bias, casuistry, cavil, deceit, deception, deceptiveness, delusion, deviation, elusion, equivocation, erratum, erroneousness, error, evasion, falsehood, faultiness, flaw, heresy,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 7 fallacy — ► NOUN (pl. fallacies) 1) a mistaken belief. 2) a failure in reasoning which makes an argument invalid. DERIVATIVES fallacious adjective. ORIGIN Latin fallacia, from fallere deceive …

    English terms dictionary

  • 8 Fallacy — In logic and rhetoric, a fallacy is usually incorrect argumentation in reasoning resulting in a misconception or presumption. By accident or design, fallacies may exploit emotional triggers in the listener or interlocutor (appeal to emotion), or… …

    Wikipedia

  • 9 fallacy — /fal euh see/, n., pl. fallacies. 1. a deceptive, misleading, or false notion, belief, etc.: That the world is flat was at one time a popular fallacy. 2. a misleading or unsound argument. 3. deceptive, misleading, or false nature; erroneousness.… …

    Universalium

  • 10 fallacy — n. 1) a fallacy to + int. (it s a fallacy to assume that he will help) 2) a fallacy that (it s a fallacy that all politicians are corrupt) * * * [ fæləsɪ] a fallacy that (it s a fallacy) that all politicians are corrupt a fallacy to + inf. (it s… …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 11 fallacy — Synonyms and related words: Albigensianism, Arianism, Catharism, Ebionitism, Erastianism, Gnosticism, Jovinianism, Lollardy, Manichaeanism, Manichaeism, Monophysism, Monophysitism, Pelagianism, Waldensianism, Wyclifism, aberrancy, aberration,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 12 fallacy — [[t]fæ̱ləsi[/t]] fallacies N VAR: oft N that, N of n/ ing A fallacy is an idea which many people believe to be true, but which is in fact false because it is based on incorrect information or reasoning. It s a fallacy that the affluent give… …

    English dictionary

  • 13 fallacy — Any error of reasoning. Reasoning may fail in many ways, and a great variety of fallacies have been distinguished and named. The main division is into formal fallacies in which something purports to be deductively valid reasoning but is not, and… …

    Philosophy dictionary

  • 14 fallacy — fal|la|cy [ˈfæləsi] n plural fallacies [Date: 1400 1500; : Latin; Origin: fallacia, from fallere to deceive ] 1.) a false idea or belief, especially one that a lot of people believe is true = ↑misconception ▪ It s a common fallacy that a neutered …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 15 fallacy — noun 1 (C) a false idea or belief, especially one that a lot of people believe is true: It s a common fallacy to think that crime is caused by poverty. 2 (C, U) formal a weakness in someone s argument or ideas which is caused by a mistake in… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 16 fallacy — UK [ˈfæləsɪ] / US noun Word forms fallacy : singular fallacy plural fallacies 1) [countable] an idea or belief that is false but that many people think is true 2) [countable/uncountable] formal a mistake in an argument or idea that makes it false …

    English dictionary

  • 17 fallacy — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) n. error, flaw, misconception; false meaning. Ant., truth. II (Roget s IV) n. 1. [An error in reasoning] Syn. inconsistency, illogicality, sophism, sophistry, casuistry, quibble, quibbling, evasion,… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 18 fallacy — fal|la|cy [ fæləsi ] noun 1. ) count an idea or belief that is false but that many people think is true 2. ) count or uncount FORMAL a mistake in an argument or idea that makes it false: The new study shows the fallacy in previous reasoning …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 19 FALLACY —    arguments which seem correct but upon examination prove false. They are arguments which are PSYCHOLOGICALLY persuasive but logically wrong through mistakes in relating, inferring, or concluding, while reasoning. TRADITIONAL logic identified… …

    Concise dictionary of Religion

  • 20 fallacy — noun the fallacy that Abner Doubleday invented the game of baseball Syn: misconception, misbelief, delusion, mistaken impression, error, misapprehension, misinterpretation, misconstruction, mistake; untruth, inconsistency, myth …

    Thesaurus of popular words


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