feeling+of+certainty

  • 1 certainty — certainty, certitude Leaving aside special meanings in philosophy, both words imply the absence of doubt about the truth of something, but certitude is a more subjective feeling whereas certainty is, strictly speaking, verifiable. In practice,… …

    Modern English usage

  • 2 Certainty — series Agnosticism Belief Certainty Doubt Determinism Epistemology Estimation Fallibilism …

    Wikipedia

  • 3 certainty */*/ — UK [ˈsɜː(r)t(ə)ntɪ] / US [ˈsɜrt(ə)ntɪ] noun Word forms certainty : singular certainty plural certainties 1) [countable] something that will definitely happen or that you feel very sure about He clung to the certainties of his Catholic faith. 2)… …

    English dictionary

  • 4 certainty — cer|tain|ty [ sɜrtnti ] noun ** 1. ) count something that will definitely happen or that you feel very sure about: Victory looked like a certainty, but then we lost three games back to back. He clung to the certainties of his Catholic faith. 2. ) …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 5 certainty — [ˈsɜːt(ə)nti] noun 1) [C] something that will definitely happen, or that you feel very sure about Victory looked like a certainty.[/ex] 2) [U] the feeling of being completely sure about something Syn: conviction Ant: uncertainty I can say with… …

    Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • 6 Moral certainty — Moral Mor al, a. [F., fr. It. moralis, fr. mos, moris, manner, custom, habit, way of life, conduct.] 1. Relating to duty or obligation; pertaining to those intentions and actions of which right and wrong, virtue and vice, are predicated, or to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 Miss Smilla's Feeling for Snow — Smilla s Sense of Snow   Cover of US edition …

    Wikipedia

  • 8 gut feeling — gut feeling/instinct/ phrase a feeling that you are certain is right, although you can give no good reason why Beverly had a gut feeling there was something seriously wrong. Thesaurus: certainty and being certainsynonym Main entry …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 9 certitude — certainty, certitude Leaving aside special meanings in philosophy, both words imply the absence of doubt about the truth of something, but certitude is a more subjective feeling whereas certainty is, strictly speaking, verifiable. In practice,… …

    Modern English usage

  • 10 Phenomenalism — • Philosophical theories that assert that there is no knowledge other than that of phenomena Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Phenomenalism     Phenomenalism      …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 11 Allais paradox — The Allais paradox is a choice problem designed by Maurice Allais to show an inconsistency of actual observed choices with the predictions of expected utility theory. Contents 1 Statement of the Problem 2 Mathematical proof of inconsistency 2.1… …

    Wikipedia

  • 12 confidence — noun /ˈkɒnfɪdəns/ a) Self assurance. b) Expression or feeling of certainty. Ant: fear See Also: confidant, confidante, confident, confidential …

    Wiktionary

  • 13 belief — [[t]bɪli͟ːf[/t]] ♦♦♦ beliefs 1) N UNCOUNT: usu N in n Belief is a feeling of certainty that something exists, is true, or is good. One billion people throughout the world are Muslims, united by belief in one god. ...a belief in personal liberty.… …

    English dictionary

  • 14 belief — n. 1. Believing (the active phase of the fact), persuasion, conviction, confidence, trust, reliance, assurance, feeling of certainty. See faith. 2. Being believed (the passive phase), credence, credit, acceptance, assent, currency. 3. Creed (the… …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 15 reason — n 1 Reason, ground, argument, proof are comparable when they mean a point or series of points offered or capable of being offered in support of something questioned or disputed. Reason usually implies the need of justification, either to oneself… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 16 cer|ti|tude — «SUR tuh tood, tyood», noun. the state or quality of feeling certain; certainty; absence of doubt; sureness. ╂[< Late Latin certitūdō < Latin certus sure; certain] …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 17 epistemology — epistemological /i pis teuh meuh loj i keuhl/, adj. epistemologically, adv. epistemologist, n. /i pis teuh mol euh jee/, n. a branch of philosophy that investigates the origin, nature, methods, and limits of human knowledge. [1855 60; < Gk… …

    Universalium

  • 18 Europe, history of — Introduction       history of European peoples and cultures from prehistoric times to the present. Europe is a more ambiguous term than most geographic expressions. Its etymology is doubtful, as is the physical extent of the area it designates.… …

    Universalium

  • 19 Idealism (italian) and after — Italian idealism and after Gentile, Croce and others Giacomo Rinaldi INTRODUCTION The history of twentieth century Italian philosophy is strongly influenced both by the peculiar character of its evolution in the preceding century and by… …

    History of philosophy

  • 20 biblical literature — Introduction       four bodies of written works: the Old Testament writings according to the Hebrew canon; intertestamental works, including the Old Testament Apocrypha; the New Testament writings; and the New Testament Apocrypha.       The Old… …

    Universalium


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