forbear

  • 1 Forbear — For*bear (f[o^]r*b[^a]r ), v. i. [imp. {Forbore}({Forbare}, [Obs.]); p. p. {Forborne}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Forbearing}.] [OE. forberen, AS. forberan; pref. for + beran to bear. See {Bear} to support.] 1. To refrain from proceeding; to pause; to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 Forbear — For*bear , v. t. 1. To keep away from; to avoid; to abstain from; to give up; as, to forbear the use of a word of doubtful propriety. [1913 Webster] But let me that plunder forbear. Shenstone. [1913 Webster] The King In open battle or the tilting …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 forbear — forbear, forebear 1. Forbear is a verb (pronounced with the stress on the second syllable) meaning ‘to abstain from, go without’ and is usually followed by to + infinitive or from + verb in ing: • He did not enquire after their progress and Nutty …

    Modern English usage

  • 4 forbear — I verb abstain, be patient, be temperate, be tolerant, bear with, break off, cease, decline, delay enforcing rights, deny oneself, desist from, dispense with, do without, endure, forgo, hold back, hold in abeyance, hold off, keep back, keep from …

    Law dictionary

  • 5 Forbear — For*bear (f[o^]r*b[^a]r ), n. [See {Fore}, and {Bear} to produce.] An ancestor; a forefather; usually in the plural. [Scot.] [Also spelled {forebear}.] Your forbears of old. Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6 forbear — 1 *forgo, abnegate, eschew, sacrifice Analogous words: *restrain, curb, bridle, inhibit: avoid, *escape, evade, shun: desist, cease (see STOP) 2 *refrain, abstain Analogous words: suffe …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 7 forbear — [v] resist the temptation to abstain, avoid, bridle, cease, curb, decline, desist, escape, eschew, evade, forgo, go easy*, hold back*, inhibit, keep, keep from, omit, pause, refrain, restrain, sacrifice, shun, stop, withhold; concepts… …

    New thesaurus

  • 8 forbear — [1] ► VERB (past forbore; past part. forborne) ▪ refrain from doing something. ORIGIN Old English …

    English terms dictionary

  • 9 forbear — forbear1 [fôr ber′] vt. forbore or Archaic forbare, forborne, forbearing [ME forberen < OE forberan: see FOR & BEAR1] 1. to refrain from; avoid or cease (doing, saying, etc.) 2. Now Chiefly Dial. to endure; tolerate …

    English World dictionary

  • 10 forbear — for|bear1 [fo:ˈbeə, fə US fo:rˈber, fər ] v past tense forbore [ ˈbo: US ˈbo:r] past participle forborne [ ˈbo:n US ˈbo:rn] [i]literary [: Old English; Origin: forberan] to not do something you could or would like to do because you think it is… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 11 forbear — {{11}}forbear (n.) ancestor, late 15c., from FORE (Cf. fore) before + be er one who exists; agent noun from BE (Cf. be). {{12}}forbear (v.) to abstain, O.E. forberan bear up against, control one s feelings, endure, from FOR (Cf …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 12 forbear — I UK [fɔː(r)ˈbeə(r)] / US [ˈfɔrˌber] verb [intransitive] Word forms forbear : present tense I/you/we/they forbear he/she/it forbears present participle forbearing past tense forbore UK [fɔː(r)ˈbɔː(r)] / US [fɔrˈbɔr] past participle forborne UK… …

    English dictionary

  • 13 forbear — I. verb (forbore; forborne; bearing) Etymology: Middle English forberen, from Old English forberan to endure, do without, from for + beran to bear Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. obsolete to do without 2. to hold onesel …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 14 forbear — See forbear, forebear …

    Dictionary of problem words and expressions

  • 15 Forbear — Recorded as Ferber, Forbear, Forber, Furber, and others, this is an English surname. However its ultimate origins are in the pre 10th century Old French word fourbisseor , introduced after the famous Conquest of 1066, and meaning to burnish. As… …

    Surnames reference

  • 16 forbear — for|bear1 [ fɔr,ber ] (past tense for|bore [ fɔr bɔr ] ; past participle for|borne [ fɔr bɔrn ] ) verb intransitive FORMAL to stop yourself from doing or saying something, especially in a way that shows that you are polite or patient forbear… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 17 forbear — [[t]fɔː(r)be͟ə(r)[/t]] forbears, forbearing, forbore, forborne VERB If you forbear to do something, you do not do it although you have the opportunity or the right to do it. [FORMAL] [V to inf] I forbore to comment on this... [V from ing/n …

    English dictionary

  • 18 forbear — 1 past tense forbore past participle forborne verb (I) formal to not do something, even though you could do it if you wanted to (+ from): He forbore from making suggestions for fear of insulting her. | forbear to do sth: Clara forbore to mention… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 19 forbear — verb can you forbear from drinking? Syn: refrain from, abstain from, desist from, keep from, restrain oneself from, stop oneself from, hold back from, withhold from; resist the temptation to (be); eschew, avoid, decline to (be) Ant: persist …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 20 forbear — see bear and forbear …

    Proverbs new dictionary