gesture

  • 1 gesture — n Gesture, gesticulation are comparable when meaning an expressive movement or motion of the body or limbs or the use of such a movement or motion. Gesture is the more inclusive term; it may imply any such movement or motion intended to express… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 2 gesture — [jes′chər] n. [ME < ML gestura, mode of action < L gestus, pp. of gerere, to bear, carry] 1. a movement, or movements collectively, of the body, or of part of the body, to express or emphasize ideas, emotions, etc. 2. anything said or done… …

    English World dictionary

  • 3 Gesture — Ges ture, n. [LL. gestura mode of action, fr. L. gerere, gestum, to bear, behave, perform, act. See {Gest} a deed.] 1. Manner of carrying the body; position of the body or limbs; posture. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Accubation, or lying down at meals,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 Gesture — Ges ture, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Gestured}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Gesturing}.] To accompany or illustrate with gesture or action; to gesticulate. [1913 Webster] It is not orderly read, nor gestured as beseemeth. Hooker. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 gesture — (n.) early 15c., manner of carrying the body, from M.L. gestura bearing, behavior, from L. gestus gesture, carriage, posture (see GEST (Cf. gest)). Restricted sense of a movement of the body or a part of it is from 1550s; figurative sense of… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 6 gesture — [n] motion as communication action, body language, bow, curtsy, expression, genuflection, gesticulation, high sign, indication, intimation, kinesics, mime, nod, pantomime, reminder, salute, shrug, sign, signal, sign language, token, wave, wink;… …

    New thesaurus

  • 7 gesture — ► NOUN 1) a movement of part of the body to express an idea or meaning. 2) an action performed to convey one s feelings or intentions. 3) an action performed for show in the knowledge that it will have no effect. ► VERB ▪ make a gesture.… …

    English terms dictionary

  • 8 Gesture — Ges ture, v. i. To make gestures; to gesticulate. [1913 Webster] The players . . . gestured not undecently withal. Holland. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 9 gesture — index brandish, symbol Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 10 Gesture —   [sprich: Dschästscha, dt. »Geste«], Anweisung für das Betriebssystem eines Pen Computers. Gestures werden mit einem Stift eingegeben (dem Pen), dessen Bewegungen auf dem berührungssensitiven Display vom Betriebssystem ausgewertet werden.… …

    Universal-Lexikon

  • 11 Gesture — A gesture is a form of non verbal communication made with a part of the body, used instead of or in combination with verbal communication . The language of gesture allows individuals to express a variety of feelings and thoughts, from contempt… …

    Wikipedia

  • 12 gesture — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} noun 1 movement that expresses sth ADJECTIVE ▪ dramatic, expansive, expressive, extravagant, flamboyant, melodramatic, rhetorical, sweeping, theatrical …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 13 gesture — ges|ture1 W3 [ˈdʒestʃə US ər] n [Date: 1400 1500; : Medieval Latin; Origin: gestura, from Latin gestus action, gesture , from gerere to bear ] 1.) [U and C] a movement of part of your body, especially your hands or head, to show what you mean or… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 14 gesture — I UK [ˈdʒestʃə(r)] / US [ˈdʒestʃər] noun Word forms gesture : singular gesture plural gestures ** 1) a) [countable] a movement that communicates a feeling or instruction a helpless/impatient/dramatic gesture make a gesture: Ellen rose from the… …

    English dictionary

  • 15 gesture — ges|ture1 [ dʒestʃər ] noun ** 1. ) count a movement that communicates a feeling or instruction: a helpless/impatient/dramatic gesture make a gesture: Ellen rose from the table, and they made the gesture of rising too. obscene gesture: Maxham… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 16 gesture — 01. You have to be careful with your body language in a foreign culture because, a [gesture] which is friendly in one country, may be considered very rude in another. 02. The waiter [gestured] to us to follow him. 03. He made a rude [gesture],… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 17 gesture — [[t]ʤe̱stʃə(r)[/t]] ♦♦♦ gestures, gesturing, gestured 1) N COUNT A gesture is a movement that you make with a part of your body, especially your hands, to express emotion or information. Sarah made a menacing gesture with her fist... He throws… …

    English dictionary

  • 18 gesture — gesticulation, gesture 1. Gesture is a somewhat older word (15c) than gesticulation (16c), and both are related to Latin gestus meaning ‘action’. In current use they overlap in their meanings to do with movement of the body or parts of the body… …

    Modern English usage

  • 19 gesture — 1 noun 1 (C, U) a movement of part of your body, especially your hands or head, to show what you mean or how you feel: Jim raised his hands in a despairing gesture. | This form of sign language is rich in gesture. 2 (C) something that you say or… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 20 gesture — 1. noun a) A motion of the limbs or body, especially one made to emphasize speech. The middle finger gesture is really a nonverbal swear. b) An act or a remark made as a formality or as a sign of …

    Wiktionary


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