impetuosity

  • 1 Impetuosity — Im*pet u*os i*ty, n. [Cf. F. imp[ e]tuosit[ e].] 1. The condition or quality of being impetuous; fury; violence. [1913 Webster] 2. Vehemence, or furiousnes of temper. Shak. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 impetuosity — index dispatch (promptness), inconsideration, outburst, passion, temerity Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 3 impetuosity — (n.) early 15c., violent movement, rushing, from O.Fr. impetuosité (13c.), from M.L. impetuositatem (nom. impetuositas), from L.L. impetuosus (see IMPETUOUS (Cf. impetuous)) …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 4 impetuosity — [im pech΄o͞o äs′i tē] n. [MFr impétuosité < LL impetuositas < L impetuosus] 1. the quality of being impetuous 2. pl. impetuosities an impetuous action or feeling …

    English World dictionary

  • 5 impetuosity — [[t]ɪmpe̱tʃuɒ̱sɪti[/t]] N UNCOUNT Impetuosity is the quality of being impetuous. With characteristic impetuosity, he announced he was leaving school …

    English dictionary

  • 6 impetuosity — noun a) The quality of making rash or arbitrary decisions, especially in an impulsive or forceful manner. She had however another motive, beside her obedience, to accompany the old gentleman in the chase; for by her presence she hoped in some… …

    Wiktionary

  • 7 impetuosity — impetuous ► ADJECTIVE 1) acting or done quickly and rashly. 2) moving forcefully or rapidly. DERIVATIVES impetuosity noun impetuously adverb impetuousness noun. ORIGIN Latin impetuosus, from impetere to attack …

    English terms dictionary

  • 8 impetuosity — noun (plural ties) Date: 15th century 1. the quality or state of being impetuous 2. an impetuous action or impulse …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 9 impetuosity — /im pech ooh os i tee/, n., pl. impetuosities for 2. 1. the quality or condition of being impetuous. 2. an impetuous action. [1575 85; < LL impetuos(us) IMPETUOUS + ITY] * * * …

    Universalium

  • 10 impetuosity — (Roget s IV) n. Syn. rashness, recklessness, hastiness; see carelessness , nonsense 2 …

    English dictionary for students

  • 11 impetuosity — im·pet·u·os·i·ty || ɪm‚petʃʊ É‘sÉ™tɪ / É’s n. hastiness, recklessness, lack of caution, impulsiveness …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 12 impetuosity — n. Vehemence, violence, fury, precipitancy, precipitation, haste, headlong energy or force …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 13 impetuosity — n 1. hastiness, abruptness, precipi tateness, impetuousness; rashness, temerity, recklessness, boldness, brashness, foolhardiness; impulsiveness, thoughtlessness, offhandedness, heedlessness, incaution; hot bloodedness, excitability,… …

    A Note on the Style of the synonym finder

  • 14 impetuosity — im·pet·u·os·i·ty …

    English syllables

  • 15 impetuosity — im•pet•u•os•i•ty [[t]ɪmˌpɛtʃ uˈɒs ɪ ti[/t]] n. pl. ties 1) the quality or condition of being impetuous 2) an impetuous action • Etymology: 1575–85 …

    From formal English to slang

  • 16 impetuosity — /ɪmˌpɛtʃuˈɒsəti/ (say im.pechooh osuhtee) noun (plural impetuosities) 1. impetuous quality. 2. an impetuous action …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 17 impetuosity — noun rash impulsiveness • Syn: ↑impetuousness • Derivationally related forms: ↑impetuous, ↑impetuous (for: ↑impetuousness) • Hypernyms: ↑impulsiveness …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 18 rush — rush1 rushingly, adv. /rush/, v.i. 1. to move, act, or progress with speed, impetuosity, or violence. 2. to dash, esp. to dash forward for an attack or onslaught. 3. to appear, go, pass, etc., rapidly or suddenly: The blood rushed to his face. 4 …

    Universalium

  • 19 temerity — noun I doubt they ll have the temerity to print these accusations Syn: audacity, nerve, effrontery, impudence, impertinence, cheek, gall, presumption; daring; informal face, front, neck, chutzpah •• temerity, audacity, effrontery, foolhardiness,… …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 20 Moskenstraumen — Der „Mahlstrom“ zwischen Værøy, Mosken und Moskenesøy Der „Mahlstrom“ in der Renaissance Il …

    Deutsch Wikipedia