indicative

  • 1 indicative — in‧dic‧a‧tive [ɪnˈdɪkətɪv] adjective [only before a noun] an indicative offer or price shows how much someone might pay or charge but is not definite: • We will then invite interested parties to make indicative offers. * * * indicative UK US… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 2 Indicative — In*dic a*tive, a. [L. indicativus: cf. F. indicatif.] [1913 Webster] 1. Pointing out; bringing to notice; giving intimation or knowledge of something not visible or obvious. [1913 Webster] That truth is productive of utility, and utility… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 indicative — [in′di kə tôr΄ē, in dik′ətô΄ēin dik′ə tiv] adj. [Fr indicatif < L indicativus] 1. giving an indication, suggestion, or intimation; showing; signifying [a look indicative of joy]: also indicatory [in′di kə tôr΄ē, in dik′ətô΄ē] 2. designating or …

    English World dictionary

  • 4 Indicative — In*dic a*tive, n. (Gram.) The indicative mood. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 indicative — ► ADJECTIVE 1) serving as a sign or indication. 2) Grammar (of a form of a verb) expressing a simple statement of fact, rather than something imagined, wished, or commanded. ► NOUN Grammar ▪ an indicative verb. DERIVATIVES indicatively adverb …

    English terms dictionary

  • 6 indicative — index allusive, circumstantial, distinctive, portentous (ominous), prophetic, representative, suggestive ( …

    Law dictionary

  • 7 indicative — (adj.) mid 15c., from O.Fr. indicatif (14c.), from L.L. indicativus, from indicat , pp. stem of L. indicare (see INDICATION (Cf. indication)) …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 8 indicative — [adj] exhibitive apocalyptic, augural, auspicious, characteristic, connotative, demonstrative, denotative, denotive, designative, diagnostic, emblematic, evidential, evincive, expressive, inauspicious, indicatory, indicial, ominous, pointing to,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 9 indicative — in|dic|a|tive1 [ınˈdıkətıv] n [U and C] technical the form of a verb that is used to make statements. For example, in the sentences Penny passed her test , and Michael likes cake , the verbs passed and like are in the indicative. indicative 2… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 10 indicative — [[t]ɪndɪ̱kətɪv[/t]] 1) ADJ GRADED: usu v link ADJ, usu ADJ of n/wh If one thing is indicative of another, it suggests what the other thing is likely to be. [FORMAL] His action is indicative of growing concern about the shortage of skilled labour …

    English dictionary

  • 11 indicative — I. adjective Date: 15th century 1. of, relating to, or constituting a verb form or set of verb forms that represents the denoted act or state as an objective fact < the indicative mood > 2. serving to indicate < actions indicative of fear > •… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 12 indicative — 1 adjective 1 be indicative of to be a clear sign that a particular situation exists or that something is likely to be true: This behaviour is indicative of her whole attitude, I m afraid. 2 technical an indicative verb form is used for making… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 13 indicative — I UK [ɪnˈdɪkətɪv] / US adjective formal showing that something will happen, is true, or exists indicative of: These latest figures are indicative of a slowing economy. II UK [ɪnˈdɪkətɪv] / US noun [singular] Word forms indicative : singular… …

    English dictionary

  • 14 indicative — indicatively, adv. /in dik euh tiv/, adj. 1. showing, signifying, or pointing out; expressive or suggestive (usually fol. by of): behavior indicative of mental disorder. 2. Gram. noting or pertaining to the mood of the verb used for ordinary… …

    Universalium

  • 15 indicative — 1. adjective /ɪnˈdɪk.ə.tɪv/ a) serving as a sign, indication or suggestion of something He had pains indicative of a heart attack. b) of, or relating to the indicative mood 2. noun …

    Wiktionary

  • 16 indicative — in|dic|a|tive1 [ ın dıkətıv ] adjective FORMAL showing that something will happen, is true, or exists: indicative of: These latest figures are indicative of a slowing economy. indicative in|dic|a|tive 2 [ ın dıkətıv ] noun count LINGUISTICS a… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 17 indicative — in•dic•a•tive [[t]ɪnˈdɪk ə tɪv[/t]] adj. 1) pointing out; expressive: behavior indicative of mental disorder[/ex] 2) gram. of or designating the grammatical mood used for ordinary objective statements and questions, as the mood of the verb plays… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 18 indicative — /ɪnˈdɪkətɪv / (say in dikuhtiv) adjective 1. (sometimes followed by of) that indicates; pointing out; suggestive. 2. Grammar designating or relating to the mood of the verb used in ordinary statements, questions, etc., in contrast to hypothetical …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 19 indicative — ● indicatif, indicative adjectif (bas latin indicativus) Qui sert à indiquer : Signe indicatif. ● indicatif, indicative (expressions) adjectif (bas latin indicativus) À titre indicatif, pour donner un renseignement d ord …

    Encyclopédie Universelle

  • 20 indicative — adj. VERBS ▪ be ▪ consider sth, interpret sth as, regard sth as, see sth as, take sth as ▪ The rise in unemployment is seen as indicative of a new economic recession …

    Collocations dictionary


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