inward+impulses

  • 1 Reins — (r[=a]nz), n. pl. [F. rein, pl. reins, fr. L. ren, pl. renes.] 1. The kidneys; also, the region of the kidneys; the loins. [1913 Webster] 2. The inward impulses; the affections and passions; so called because formerly supposed to have their seat… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 Reins of a vault — Reins Reins (r[=a]nz), n. pl. [F. rein, pl. reins, fr. L. ren, pl. renes.] 1. The kidneys; also, the region of the kidneys; the loins. [1913 Webster] 2. The inward impulses; the affections and passions; so called because formerly supposed to have …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 afferent neurone — A sensory neuron that conveys inward impulses received or perceived by a sense organ from external sources …

    Dictionary of invertebrate zoology

  • 4 reins — n. pl. 1. Kidneys. 2. Loins, lower part of the back, lumbar region. 3. Affections, passions, inward impulses …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 5 ear, human — ▪ anatomy Introduction       organ of hearing and equilibrium that detects and analyzes noises by transduction (or the conversion of sound waves into electrochemical impulses) and maintains the sense of balance (equilibrium).  The human ear, like …

    Universalium

  • 6 nervous system — Anat., Zool. 1. the system of nerves and nerve centers in an animal or human, including the brain, spinal cord, nerves, and ganglia. 2. a particular part of this system. Cf. autonomic nervous system, central nervous system, peripheral nervous… …

    Universalium

  • 7 sound reception — Introduction       response of an organism s aural mechanism, the ear, to a specific form of energy change, or sound waves. Sound waves can be transmitted through gases, liquids, or solids, but the hearing function of each species is particularly …

    Universalium

  • 8 eye, human — ▪ anatomy Introduction  specialized sense organ capable of receiving visual images, which are then carried to the brain. Anatomy of the visual apparatus Structures auxiliary to the eye The orbit       The eye is protected from mechanical injury… …

    Universalium

  • 9 KABBALAH — This entry is arranged according to the following outline: introduction general notes terms used for kabbalah the historical development of the kabbalah the early beginnings of mysticism and esotericism apocalyptic esotericism and merkabah… …

    Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • 10 Christianity — /kris chee an i tee/, n., pl. Christianities. 1. the Christian religion, including the Catholic, Protestant, and Eastern Orthodox churches. 2. Christian beliefs or practices; Christian quality or character: Christianity mixed with pagan elements; …

    Universalium

  • 11 Action potential — In physiology, an action potential is a short lasting event in which the electrical membrane potential of a cell rapidly rises and falls, following a consistent trajectory. Action potentials occur in several types of animal cells, called… …

    Wikipedia

  • 12 Cardiac pacemaker — The contractions of the heart are controlled by chemical impulses, which fire at a rate which controls the beat of the heart.The cells that create these rhythmical impulses are called pacemaker cells, and they directly control the heart rate.… …

    Wikipedia

  • 13 tragedy — /traj i dee/, n., pl. tragedies. 1. a dramatic composition, often in verse, dealing with a serious or somber theme, typically that of a great person destined through a flaw of character or conflict with some overpowering force, as fate or society …

    Universalium

  • 14 neuron — neuronal /noor euh nl, nyoor , noo rohn l, nyoo /, adj. /noor on, nyoor /, n. Cell Biol. a specialized, impulse conducting cell that is the functional unit of the nervous system, consisting of the cell body and its processes, the axon and… …

    Universalium

  • 15 literature — /lit euhr euh cheuhr, choor , li treuh /, n. 1. writings in which expression and form, in connection with ideas of permanent and universal interest, are characteristic or essential features, as poetry, novels, history, biography, and essays. 2.… …

    Universalium

  • 16 Hypnotism — • The nervous sleep, induced by artificial and external means, which has been made the subject of experiment and methodical study by men of science, physicians or physiologists Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Hypnotism     Hypn …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 17 Reflex — A reaction that is involuntary. The corneal reflex is the blink that occurs with irritation of the eye. The nasal reflex is a sneeze. * * * 1. An involuntary reaction in response to a stimulus applied to the periphery and transmitted to the… …

    Medical dictionary

  • 18 ZIONISM — This article is arranged according to the following outline: the word and its meaning forerunners ḤIBBAT ZION ROOTS OF ḤIBBAT ZION background to the emergence of the movement the beginnings of the movement PINSKER S AUTOEMANCIPATION settlement… …

    Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • 19 Vertebral subluxation — is a chiropractic term that is used to describe a myriad of signs and symptoms (syndrome) thought to occur as a result of a misaligned or dysfunctional spinal segment. The chiropractic subluxation complex is a functional biomechanical spinal… …

    Wikipedia

  • 20 Freud, Sigmund — born May 6, 1856, Freiberg, Moravia, Austrian Empire died Sept. 23, 1939, London, Eng. Austrian neuropsychologist, founder of psychoanalysis, and one of the major intellectual figures of the 20th century. Trained in Vienna as a neurologist, Freud …

    Universalium