prolong

  • 1 Prolong — Pro*long , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Prolonged}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Prolonging}.] [F. prolonger, L. prolongare; pro before, forth + longus long. See {Long}, a., and cf. {Prolongate}, {Purloin}. ] [1913 Webster] 1. To extend in space or length; as, to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 prolong — early 15c., from O.Fr. prolonguer (13c.), from L.L. prolongare to prolong, extend, from L. pro forth (see PRO (Cf. pro )) + longus long (adj.); see LONG (Cf. long) (adj.) …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 3 prolong — I verb be steadfast, continue, drag out, draw out, extend, extendere, hold over, increase, keep, lengthen, linger, maintain, make longer, perpetuate, persevere, preserve, prorogare, protract, retain, slow down, spin out, stretch, sustain, tarry,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 4 prolong — protract, Cxtend, lengthen, elongate Analogous words: Continue, last, persist, endure: increase, augment, enlarge: *expand, amplify Antonyms: curtail Contrasted words: *shorten, abridge, abbreviate, retrench …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 5 prolong — [v] extend, draw out carry on, continue, delay, drag one’s feet*, drag out*, hold, hold up, increase, lengthen, let it ride*, make longer, pad*, perpetuate, protract, spin out*, stall, stretch, stretch out; concepts 239,250 Ant. abbreviate,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 6 prolong — ► VERB 1) extend the duration of. 2) technical extend in spatial length. DERIVATIVES prolongation noun. ORIGIN Latin prolongare …

    English terms dictionary

  • 7 prolong — [prə lôŋ′gāt΄] vt. prolongated, prolongating [prō lôŋ′, prəlôŋ′] vt. [ME prolongen < MFr prolonguer < LL prolongare < L pro , forth + longus, long: see PRO 2 & LONG1] to lengthen or extend in time or space: also prolongate [pr …

    English World dictionary

  • 8 Prolong — Le Prolong est un traitement médical fictif de la série de romans Honor Harrington de David Weber. Le prolong est un processus de génie génétique ayant pour résultat la prolongation de l’espérance de vie. Elle a été développée sur Beowulf deux ou …

    Wikipédia en Français

  • 9 prolong — verb ADVERB ▪ significantly ▪ indefinitely ▪ Might it be possible to prolong life indefinitely? ▪ artificially ▪ deliberately …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 10 prolong — prolongable, adj. prolongableness, n. prolongably, adv. prolonger, n. prolongment, n. /preuh lawng , long /, v.t. 1. to lengthen out in time; extend the duration of; cause to continue longer: to prolong one s stay abroad. 2. to make longer in… …

    Universalium

  • 11 prolong — pro|long [prəˈlɔŋ US ˈlo:ŋ] v [T] [Date: 1400 1500; : Old French; Origin: prolonguer, from Late Latin prolongare, from Latin longus long ] 1.) to deliberately make something such as a feeling or activity last longer = ↑lengthen ▪ I was trying to… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 12 prolong — verb (T) 1 to deliberately make something such as a feeling or activity last longer: I was trying to think of some way to prolong the conversation. 2 prolong the agony informal to delay telling someone something that they very much want to know:… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 13 prolong — UK [prəˈlɒŋ] / US [proʊˈlɔŋ] verb [transitive] Word forms prolong : present tense I/you/we/they prolong he/she/it prolongs present participle prolonging past tense prolonged past participle prolonged to make something last longer The ongoing… …

    English dictionary

  • 14 prolong — /prəˈlɒŋ / (say pruh long) verb (t) 1. to lengthen out in time; to extend the duration of; to cause to continue longer: to prolong one s life. 2. to make longer in spatial extent: to prolong a line. {late Middle English prolonge(n), from Late… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 15 prolong — verb a) To extend in space or length. The government shouldnt prolong deciding on this issue any further. b) To lengthen in time; to extend the duration of; to draw out; …

    Wiktionary

  • 16 prolong — pro|long [ prou lɔŋ ] verb transitive to make something last longer: The ongoing violence has prolonged the suffering of our people. ─ opposite CURTAIL prolong the agony to delay doing something that is difficult or unpleasant …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 17 prolong — [[t]prəlɒ̱ŋ, AM lɔːŋ[/t]] prolongs, prolonging, prolonged VERB To prolong something means to make it last longer. [V n] Mr Chesler said foreign military aid was prolonging the war... [V n] The actual action of the drug can be prolonged… …

    English dictionary

  • 18 prolong — pro•long [[t]prəˈlɔŋ, ˈlɒŋ[/t]] v. t. 1) to extend the duration of; cause to continue longer 2) to make longer in spatial extent: to prolong a line[/ex] • Etymology: 1375–1425; late ME < LL prōlongāre to lengthen =prō pro I+ longāre, v. der.… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 19 prolong — transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French prolonguer, from Late Latin prolongare, from Latin pro forward + longus long Date: 15th century 1. to lengthen in time ; continue 2. to lengthen in extent, scope, or range Synonyms:… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 20 prolong — prolongation, prolonged …

    Medical dictionary


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