recover

  • 1 recover — re‧cov‧er [rɪˈkʌvə ǁ ər] verb 1. [intransitive] to increase or improve after falling in value or getting worse: • Its shares plunged at the start of trading, but recovered to close only slightly down. 2. [transitive] FINANCE to get back money… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 2 Recover — Re*cov er (r?*k?v ?r), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Recovered} ( ?rd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Recovering}. ] [OE. recoveren, OF. recovrer, F. recouvrer, from L. recuperare; pref. re re + a word of unknown origin. Cf.{Recuperate}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To get or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 recover — re·cov·er /ri kə vər/ vt 1: to get back or get back an equivalent for recover costs through higher prices 2 a: to obtain or get back (as damages, satisfaction for a debt, or property) through a judgment or decree recover damages in a tort action… …

    Law dictionary

  • 4 recover — 1 Recover, regain, retrieve, recoup, recruit can mean to get back something that has been let go or lost. Recover, the most comprehensive of these terms, may imply a finding or obtaining something material or immaterial that has been lost… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 5 recover — [ri kuv′ər] vt. [ME recoveren < OFr recovrer < L recuperare: see RECUPERATE] 1. a) to get back (something lost or stolen) b) to regain (health, consciousness, etc.) 2. to compensate for; make up for [to recover losses] 3 …

    English World dictionary

  • 6 Recover — Re*cov er (r?*k?v ?r), v. i. 1. To regain health after sickness; to grow well; to be restored or cured; hence, to regain a former state or condition after misfortune, alarm, etc.; often followed by of or from; as, to recover from a state of… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 recover — c.1300, to regain consciousness, from Anglo Fr. rekeverer (late 13c.), O.Fr. recovrer, from L. recuperare to recover (see RECUPERATION (Cf. recuperation)). Meaning to regain health or strength is from early 14c.; sense of to get (anything) back… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 8 recover — [v1] find again balance, bring back, catch up, compensate, get back, make good, obtain again, offset, reacquire, recapture, reclaim, recoup, recruit, redeem, rediscover, regain, reoccupy, repair, replevin, replevy, repossess, rescue, restore,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 9 Recover — Re*cov er, n. Recovery. Sir T. Malory. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 10 Recover — Re*cov er (r?*k?v ?r), v. t. [Pref. re + cover: cf. F. recouvrir.] To cover again. Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 11 recover — recover,   Synonym für restore …

    Universal-Lexikon

  • 12 recover — ► VERB 1) return to a normal state of health, mind, or strength. 2) find or regain possession of. 3) regain or secure (compensation). 4) remove or extract (an energy source, chemical, etc.) for use, reuse, or waste treatment. DERIVATIVES… …

    English terms dictionary

  • 13 recover — [[t]rɪkʌ̱və(r)[/t]] ♦♦♦ recovers, recovering, recovered 1) VERB When you recover from an illness or an injury, you become well again. [V from n/ ing] He is recovering from a knee injury... A policeman was recovering in hospital last night after… …

    English dictionary

  • 14 recover — 01. It took my grandmother a long time to [recover] from the death of my grandfather. 02. Doctors believe my mother s quick [recovery] from her illness was partly due to her desire to see her grandchildren again. 03. Police have announced that… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 15 recover — I UK [rɪˈkʌvə(r)] / US [rɪˈkʌvər] verb Word forms recover : present tense I/you/we/they recover he/she/it recovers present participle recovering past tense recovered past participle recovered *** 1) [intransitive] to become fit and healthy again… …

    English dictionary

  • 16 recover — recoverer, n. /ri kuv euhr/, v.t. 1. to get back or regain (something lost or taken away): to recover a stolen watch. 2. to make up for or make good (loss, damage, etc., to oneself). 3. to regain the strength, composure, balance, or the like, of… …

    Universalium

  • 17 recover — re|cov|er W2 [rıˈkʌvə US ər] v [Date: 1200 1300; : Old French; Origin: recovrer, from Latin recuperare; RECUPERATE] 1.) to get better after an illness, accident, shock etc ▪ After a few days of fever, she began to recover. recover from ▪ He s in… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 18 recover — 1 verb 1 GET BETTER (I) 2 a) to get better after an illness, accident, shock etc: After a few days of fever, he began to recover. (+ from): My boss is recovering from a heart attack. b) if something recovers after a period of trouble or… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 19 recover — re|cov|er1 [ rı kʌvər ] verb *** 1. ) intransitive to become fit and healthy again after an illness or an injury: recover from: I haven t fully recovered from that flu I had. a ) to stop being affected by an unpleasant experience: He was fired… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 20 recover — verb 1) he s recovering from a heart attack Syn: recuperate, get better, convalesce, regain one s strength, get stronger, get back on one s feet; be on the mend, be on the road to recovery, pick up, rally, respond to treatment, improve, heal,… …

    Thesaurus of popular words


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