scold

  • 1 scold — n shrew, vixen, termagant, *virago, amazon scold vb Scold, upbraid, rate, berate, tongue lash, jaw, bawl, chew out, wig, rail, revile, vituperate can all mean to reprove, reproach, or censure angrily, harshly, and more or less abusively. Scold,… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 2 scold´er — scold «skohld», verb, noun. –v.t. to find fault with; blame with angry words: »His brother scolded him for breaking the baseball bat. –v.i. 1. to find fault; talk angrily: »Don t scold so much. 2. Obsolete. to quarrel noisily; brawl. ╂[< noun] …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 3 Scold — Scold, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Scolded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Scolding}.] [Akin to D. schelden, G. schelten, OHG. sceltan, Dan. skielde.] To find fault or rail with rude clamor; to brawl; to utter harsh, rude, boisterous rebuke; to chide sharply or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 Scold — Scold, n. 1. One who scolds, or makes a practice of scolding; esp., a rude, clamorous woman; a shrew. [1913 Webster] She is an irksome, brawling scold. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. A scolding; a brawl. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 scold — [skəuld US skould] v [T] [Date: 1200 1300; Origin: Probably from a Scandinavian language] to angrily criticize someone, especially a child, about something they have done = ↑tell off ▪ Do not scold the puppy, but simply and firmly say no. scold… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 6 scold — scold·er; scold·ing·ly; scold; …

    English syllables

  • 7 Scold — Scold, v. t. To chide with rudeness and clamor; to rate; also, to rebuke or reprove with severity. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8 scold — [skōld] n. [ME scolde < ON skald, poet (prob. of satirical verses)] a person, esp. a woman, who habitually uses abusive language vt. [ME scolden < the n.] to find fault with angrily; rebuke or chide severely vi. 1. to find fault angrily 2.… …

    English World dictionary

  • 9 scold — index castigate, denounce (condemn), disapprove (condemn), fault, inveigh, rebuke, remonstrate …

    Law dictionary

  • 10 scold — (n.) mid 12c., person of ribald speech, also person fond of abusive language, from O.N. skald poet (see SKALD (Cf. skald)). The sense evolution may reflect the fact that Germanic poets (like their Celtic counterparts) were famously feared for… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 11 scold — [v] find fault with abuse, admonish, asperse, berate, blame, castigate, cavil, censure, chasten, chide, criticize, denounce, disparage, dress down*, expostulate, give a talking to*, jump on*, keep aft*, lay down the law*, lecture, light into*,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 12 scold — ► VERB ▪ angrily remonstrate with or rebuke. ► NOUN archaic ▪ a woman who nags or grumbles constantly. ORIGIN probably from an Old Norse word meaning a person who writes and recites epic poems …

    English terms dictionary

  • 13 scold — 1. verb Mom took Anna away, scolding her for her bad behavior Syn: rebuke, reprimand, reproach, reprove, admonish, remonstrate with, chastise, chide, upbraid, berate, take to task, read someone the riot act, give someone a piece of one s mind,… …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 14 scold — I n. person who constantly complains a common scold II v. (D; intr.) to scold about, for (they scolded me for being late) * * * [skəʊld] for (they scolded me for being late) (D; intr.) to scold about [ person who constantly complains ] a common… …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 15 scold — I. noun Etymology: Middle English scald, scold, perhaps of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse skāld poet, skald, Icelandic skālda to make scurrilous verse Date: 12th century 1. a. one who scolds habitually or persistently b. a woman who… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 16 scold — 01. The little boy began to cry after being [scolded] by his mother. 02. I didn t do my homework, so my teacher [scolded] me. 03. The teacher [scolded] the children for running in the halls. 04. The governor [scolded] the press for its criticism… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 17 scold — [13] Scold was originally a noun, denoting an argumentative or nagging woman – the sort who had a ‘scold’s bridle’ fitted to keep her tongue quiet. It appears to have been borrowed from Old Norse skáld ‘poet’, the semantic link perhaps being the… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 18 scold — [13] Scold was originally a noun, denoting an argumentative or nagging woman – the sort who had a ‘scold’s bridle’ fitted to keep her tongue quiet. It appears to have been borrowed from Old Norse skáld ‘poet’, the semantic link perhaps being the… …

    Word origins

  • 19 scold — scold1 [ skould ] verb transitive to criticize someone, especially a child, severely and usually angrily for something they have done wrong: He never raised his voice or scolded me unfairly. scold scold 2 [ skould ] noun count OLD FASHIONED a… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 20 scold — [[t]sko͟ʊld[/t]] scolds, scolding, scolded VERB If you scold someone, you speak angrily to them because they have done something wrong. [FORMAL] [V n] If he finds out, he ll scold me... [V n for n] Later she scolded her daughter for having talked …

    English dictionary


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