subdue

  • 1 Subdue — Sub*due , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Subdued}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Subduing}.] [OE. soduen, OF. sosduire to seduce, L. subtus below (fr. sub under) + ducere to lead. See {Duke}, and cf. {Subduct}.] 1. To bring under; to conquer by force or the exertion of …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 subdue — I verb abate, allay, beat, beat down, bend, best, break, bring under rule, calm, captivate, capture, choke, conquer, control, crush, curb, deaden, defeat, discipline, discomfit, domare, dominate, dull, enthrall, foil, get the better of, harness,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 3 subdue — (v.) late 14c., to conquer, from O.Fr. souduire deceive, seduce, from L. subducere draw, lead away, withdraw (see SUBDUCE (Cf. subduce)). The sense seems to have been taken in Anglo French from L. subdere. Subduct in the sense of subtract is from …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 4 subdue — subjugate, reduce, overcome, surmount, overthrow, rout, *conquer, vanquish, defeat, beat, lick Analogous words: control, manage, direct (see CONDUCT vb): discipline, *punish, correct: foil, thwart, circumvent, *frustrate: *suppress, repress… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 5 subdue — [v] keep under control; moderate bear down, beat down, break, break in, check, conquer, control, crush, defeat, discipline, dominate, drop, extinguish, gentle, get the better of*, get the upper hand*, get under control, humble, mellow, overcome,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 6 subdue — ► VERB (subdues, subdued, subduing) 1) overcome, quieten, or bring under control. 2) bring (a country) under control by force. ORIGIN Latin subducere draw from below …

    English terms dictionary

  • 7 subdue — [səbdo͞o′, səbdyo͞o′] vt. subdued, subduing [ME subdewen (altered in sense and form by assoc. with L subdere, to put under, subject) < OFr soduire, to withdraw, seduce < L subducere: see SUBDUCE] 1. to bring into subjection; conquer;… …

    English World dictionary

  • 8 subdue — [[t]səbdju͟ː, AM du͟ː[/t]] subdues, subduing, subdued 1) VERB If soldiers or the police subdue a group of people, they defeat them or bring them under control by using force. [V n] Senior government officials admit they have not been able to… …

    English dictionary

  • 9 subdue — UK [səbˈdjuː] / US [səbˈdu] verb [transitive] Word forms subdue : present tense I/you/we/they subdue he/she/it subdues present participle subduing past tense subdued past participle subdued 1) to hold someone and make them stop behaving in an… …

    English dictionary

  • 10 subdue — subduable, adj. subduableness, n. subduably, adv. subduer, n. subduingly, adv. /seuhb dooh , dyooh /, v.t., subdued, subduing. 1. to conquer and bring into subjection: Rome subdued Gaul. 2. to overpower by superior force; overcome …

    Universalium

  • 11 subdue — sub|due [səbˈdju: US ˈdu:] v [T] [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: soduire to lead into bad actions , from Latin subducere to remove ; influenced by Latin subdere to force to obey ] 1.) to defeat or control a person or group, especially… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 12 subdue — sub|due [ səb du ] verb transitive 1. ) to hold someone and make them stop behaving in an uncontrolled or violent way: It took three police officers to subdue him. 2. ) FORMAL to defeat a place or a group of people, and take control of them: By… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 13 subdue — [14] Subdue denotes etymologically ‘lead away’. It came via Anglo Norman *subduer from Latin subdūcere ‘lead away, withdraw’, a compound verb formed from the prefix sub ‘from under, away’ and dūcere ‘lead’ (source of English duct, duke, etc). The …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 14 subdue — verb (T) 1 to stop a person or group from behaving violently, especially by using force: Police managed to subdue the angry crowd. 2 formal to prevent your emotions from showing: Frank subdued his grief in order to comfort Cathy. 3 formal to take …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 15 subdue — verb 1) he subdued all his enemies Syn: conquer, defeat, vanquish, overcome, overwhelm, crush, quash, beat, trounce, subjugate, suppress, bring someone to their knees; informal lick, thrash, hammer 2) she could not subdue her …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 16 subdue — /səbˈdju / (say suhb dyooh) verb (t) (subdued, subduing) 1. to conquer and bring into subjection. 2. to overpower by superior force; overcome. 3. to bring into mental subjection, as by persuasion or by inspiring awe or fear; render submissive. 4 …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 17 subdue — [14] Subdue denotes etymologically ‘lead away’. It came via Anglo Norman *subduer from Latin subdūcere ‘lead away, withdraw’, a compound verb formed from the prefix sub ‘from under, away’ and dūcere ‘lead’ (source of English duct, duke, etc). The …

    Word origins

  • 18 subdue — transitive verb (subdued; subduing) Etymology: Middle English sodewen, subduen, from Anglo French soduire, subdure to lead astray, overcome, arrest (influenced in form and meaning by Latin subdere to subject), from Latin subducere to withdraw,… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 19 subdue — verb a) To overcome, quieten, or bring under control. b) To bring (a country) under control by force …

    Wiktionary

  • 20 subdue — Synonyms and related words: abate, allay, alleviate, anesthetize, appease, asphyxiate, assuage, attemper, baffle, bank the fire, bear down, beat down, bend, benumb, blunt, bottle up, break, break down, bridle, bring low, bring to terms, calm,… …

    Moby Thesaurus