wanton

  • 1 wanton — wan·ton / wänt ən, wȯnt / adj: manifesting extreme indifference to a risk of injury to another that is known or should have been known: characterized by knowledge of and utter disregard for probability of resulting harm a wanton act by such… …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 Wanton — Wan ton, a. [OE. wantoun, contr. from wantowen; pref. wan wanting (see {Wane}, v. i.), hence expressing negation + towen, p. p., AS. togen, p. p. of te[ o]n to draw, to educate, bring up; hence, properly, ill bred. See {Tug}, v. t.] [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 wanton — [wänt′ n] adj. [ME wantowen, var. of wantogen, wanton, irregular < OE wan , used as negative prefix < wan, lacking, deficient (see WANE) + togen, pp. of teon, to draw, educate, bring up (see TOW1)] 1. Obs. undisciplined; unmanageable [a… …

    English World dictionary

  • 4 Wanton — may refer to:* Joseph Wanton Morrison (1783 1826), British soldier * Wanton noodle, a Cantonese noodle dishPeople with the surname Wanton:* George H. Wanton (1868 1940), Buffalo Soldier in the United States Army * Joseph Wanton (1705 1780),… …

    Wikipedia

  • 5 wanton — [adj1] extravagant, lustful abandoned, fast*, lax, lewd, libertine, libidinous, licentious, outrageous, profligate, promiscuous, shameless, speedy*, unprincipled, unscrupulous, wayward, X rated*; concepts 372,401,545 Ant. clean, decent, moral,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 6 Wanton — Wan ton, n. 1. A roving, frolicsome thing; a trifler; used rarely as a term of endearment. [1913 Webster] I am afeard you make a wanton of me. Shak. [1913 Webster] Peace, my wantons; he will do More than you can aim unto. B. Jonson. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 Wanton — Wan ton, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Wantoned}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Wantoning}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To rove and ramble without restraint, rule, or limit; to revel; to play loosely; to frolic. [1913 Webster] Nature here wantoned as in her prime. Milton.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8 Wanton — Wan ton, v. t. To cause to become wanton; also, to waste in wantonness. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 9 wanton — 1 *licentious, libertine, lewd, lustful, lascivious, libidinous, lecherous Analogous words: *immoral, unmoral, amoral: *abandoned, profligate, dissolute, reprobate Antonyms: chaste Contrasted words: pure, modest, decent (see CHASTE): virtuous, * …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 10 wanton — ► ADJECTIVE 1) (of a cruel or violent action) deliberate and unprovoked. 2) sexually immodest or promiscuous. 3) literary growing profusely; luxuriant. ► NOUN archaic ▪ a sexually immodest or promiscuous woman. DERIVATIVES wantonly adverb …

    English terms dictionary

  • 11 wanton — Reckless, heedless, malicious; characterized by extreme recklessness or foolhardiness; recklessly disregardful of the rights or safety of others or of consequences. In re Wegner, C.C.A.I11., 88 F.2d 899, 902. Means undisciplined, unruly, marked… …

    Black's law dictionary

  • 12 wanton — wantonly, adv. wantonness, n. /won tn/, adj. 1. done, shown, used, etc., maliciously or unjustifiably: a wanton attack; wanton cruelty. 2. deliberate and without motive or provocation; uncalled for; headstrong; willful: Why jeopardize your career …

    Universalium

  • 13 wanton — wan•ton [[t]ˈwɒn tn[/t]] adj. 1) done maliciously or unjustifiably: wanton cruelty[/ex] 2) deliberate and without motive; unprovoked: a wanton attack[/ex] 3) without regard for what is right, just, etc.; reckless: wanton assassination of a person …

    From formal English to slang

  • 14 wanton — {{11}}wanton (adj.) c.1300, wan towen, resistant to control; willful, from Middle English privative prefix wan wanting, lacking (from O.E. wan wanting; see WANE (Cf. wane)) + togen, pp. of teon to train, discipline; lit. to pull, draw, from P.Gmc …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 15 wanton — I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from wan deficient, wrong, mis (from Old English, from wan deficient) + towen, past participle of teen to draw, train, discipline, from Old English tēon more at tow Date: 14th century 1. a. archaic hard to… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 16 wanton — /ˈwɒntən / (say wontuhn) adjective 1. done, shown, used, etc., maliciously or unjustifiably: *my father, appalled by the wanton destruction of the bird life he loved, brought in a bill for its protection –mary durack, 1959. 2. deliberate and… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 17 wanton — [[t]wɒ̱ntən[/t]] 1) ADJ: usu ADJ n A wanton action deliberately causes harm, damage, or waste without having any reason to. ...this unnecessary and wanton destruction of our environment... Wanton violence is now becoming a regular feature of… …

    English dictionary

  • 18 wanton — wan|ton [ˈwɔntən US ˈwo:n , ˈwa:n ] adj [Date: 1300 1400; Origin: wan wrongly, badly (from Old English wan lacking ) + towen, past participle of tee to pull, bring up, educate (11 16 centuries) (from Old English teon)] 1.) deliberately harming… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 19 wanton — adjective 1 wanton cruelty, destruction etc deliberately harms someone or damages something for no reason: an act of wanton aggression 2 old fashioned a wanton woman is considered immoral because she has sex with a lot of men 3 formal… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 20 wanton — adj., n., & v. adj. 1 licentious; lewd; sexually promiscuous. 2 capricious; random; arbitrary; motiveless (wanton destruction; wanton wind). 3 luxuriant; unrestrained (wanton profusion). 4 archaic playful; sportive (a wanton child). n. literary… …

    Useful english dictionary


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